Sacrosanctum Concilium and the Roots of the New Evangelization

Second Vatican Council

Our diocesan Office for Worship and the Catechumenate has been celebrating the 50th anniversary of Sacrosanctum Concilium with a brown bag lunch series on different aspects of the document. (We’re using this video resource from Liturgy Training Publications as the basis of our reflection, aided by some wonderful handouts produced by Eliot Kapitan, the director of the sponsoring office.)

The first session began with this brief video clip:

In the course of our discussions I realized something that hadn’t occurred to me before: the roots of the New Evangelization can be found in the four aims of the council as laid out in the opening of Sacrosanctum Concilium:

This sacred Council has several aims in view: it desires to impart an ever increasing vigor to the Christian life of the faithful; to adapt more suitably to the needs of our own times those institutions which are subject to change; to foster whatever can promote union among all who believe in Christ; to strengthen whatever can help to call the whole of mankind into the household of the Church. The Council therefore sees particularly cogent reasons for undertaking the reform and promotion of the liturgy. (no. 1)

If we break this paragraph down, we see that the council is concerned for

  1. reinvigorating the life of the faithful;
  2. renewing of the structures of the Church;
  3. drawing all Christians to greater unity;
  4. and calling all people into Christ’s Church.

This maps very nicely to the Church’s understanding of the New Evangelization — that it is firstly a self-renewal of all Christians, called to ongoing conversion, who strengthened by their faith in Jesus Christ then turn and invite others to rediscover and share that faith. That the council should echo what we now call the New Evangelization should not be so surprising, since the New Evangelization is itself a restating of the Chruch’s primary mission: to make disciples of all nations.

These themes are echoed throughout the council documents in various ways. As we continue to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the council we would do well to reflect again on the great challenge presented to us by the council fathers to renew our Christian walk and make Christ known to the world.

Postlude: After I mentioned this insight on Twitter, Timothy O’Malley of the Notre Dame Center for Liturgy wrote me to mention that he has a book coming out on just this topic. I’ve put it on my wish list and will be sure to review it once I’ve read it!

New Resource: Sacred Scripture and the Christian Life (A Short Study)

A few weeks ago, while our local Lumen Veritas youth group was gathering, I offered a faith study opportunity for any parents willing to hang around and listen to me drone on for a hour or so.

With the end of the Year of Faith close at hand we thought it would be good to take a look at the role of Sacred Scripture in the life of the Church through the lens of Vatican Council II. To that end I created a “short study” guide with excerpts from Sacrosanctum concilium and Dei Verbum, as well as the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults and Verbum Domini, and some reflection questions to facilitate the conversation:

I’ve released the study guide under a Creative Commons license, so feel free to print it out, make copies, and adapt it for your own use. Just make sure to credit the Diocese of Springfield in Illinois for its original creation.

Our plan is for me to do similar events for the parents once a month or so; if I create more resources like the one above I’ll be sure to share them here.

Aging, Prayer, and the Divine Office

Statue: angel prayingIt’s been a while since I took “Spirituality and Human Development,” but one of the themes I recall from the class is that our spirituality and prayer life change as we age. The accumulation of experience allows us to gain new insights into the divine and opens us to new ways of communicating with God; this, of course, has an affect on our relationship to God.

This has hit home for me a few times in my life. A year after completing my graduate studies I found myself engaging in new types of prayer — particularly an increased use of the Rosary and a greater sense of efficacy in my silent prayer. At first I was uncertain why I was being drawn in this direction (beyond my generation’s general reappropriation of older faith practices). Eventually it dawned on me: while in college and graduate school I had used my studies as the foundation for my prayer life. Indeed, there is a long history in the Church of study as prayer (to such an extent that Dominican friars are excused from communal prayer if engaged in study). Following my master’s degree and subsequent exit from higher education, my prayer life dried up for about a year as I “re-learned” how to pray. Since I was no longer spending significant time immersed in the study of scripture, Church history, morality, and the like, my normal avenue for prayer had been cut off.

While this was undoubtedly painful, it also proved to be a great blessing as it opened me to new ways of prayer that I did not have the time or energy to devote to before.

Lately, after nearly a decade of fits and starts, I’ve gotten into a general rhythm of using the Liturgy of the Hours. I’m not as consistent as I would like, but most morning and many evenings I take 10-15 minutes to pray Lauds and Vespers. I’ve not yet gotten into the habit of adding Compline, but I am working towards it.

Nevertheless, and in spite of the inconsistent nature of its application, the effect has been profound: I’ve notice a real change in my temperament and attitude when I begin the day with Morning Prayer, and a stronger resistance to temptation when I’m consistent for several days in a row. In particular I find myself dealing with my children in a more patient manner — something, my wife likes to remind me, that I need to work on.

As before, I’m not sure why it is that, at this particular moment in my life, this type of prayer has suddenly “clicked.” But unlike before I haven’t lost the types of prayer that I relied on previously. I still pray the Rosary and still find comfort in silent prayer. What I am experiencing now is a wider embrace of prayer types, not a replacing of the old.

The Second Vatican Council teaches that “the laity, too, are encouraged to recite the divine office,” for “all who render this service are not only fulfilling a duty of the Church, but also are sharing in the greatest honor of Christ’s spouse, for by offering these praises to God they are standing before God’s throne in the name of the Church their Mother.” (Sacrosanctum concilium, n. 100, 85) I am still discovering just what this mean, but I am thankful that, at this time in my life, the Liturgy of the Hours has been such a source of strength and a means of increasing virtue in my life. I pray, too, that it will continue to do so as I continue to grow in love and knowledge of God.