Dear Catechists: Please Stop Talking About Emmaus

One of my favorite hashtags on Twitter is #UnpopularOpinion. People use this hashtag to tag their contrarian opinions about subjects both topical and mundane.

In that spirit, I would like to formally state that I think the “Road to Emmaus” story is overused in the field of catechesis.

That’s not to say that there aren’t important themes in the story or that it isn’t an important touchstone in understanding the relationship between Jesus Christ and his disciples. Rather, I think that given the current crisis of discipleship in the Church and the lack of a clear Christian worldview in our culture, it is not the most appropriate biblical story to draw on to understand the work of evangelization and catechesis.

People seem to forget that the disciples on the road to Emmaus are… well… disciples. They already had a strong, developed relationship with Jesus before the crucifixion. Their only problem was in misunderstanding the nature of the Resurrection. If, as studies show, so few in our parishes can truly be described as disciples, then the relevancy of this particular story to the current catechetical culture seems tenuous.

That, of course, begs the question: What story should we be talking about?

For your consideration, I offer this episode from the Acts of the Apostles:

And he rose and went. And behold, an Ethiopian, a eunuch, a minister of the Can’dace, queen of the Ethiopians, in charge of all her treasure, had come to Jerusalem to worship and was returning; seated in his chariot, he was reading the prophet Isaiah. And the Spirit said to Philip, “Go up and join this chariot.” So Philip ran to him, and heard him reading Isaiah the prophet, and asked, “Do you understand what you are reading?” And he said, “How can I, unless some one guides me?” And he invited Philip to come up and sit with him.

Now the passage of the scripture which he was reading was this: “As a sheep led to the slaughter
or a lamb before its shearer is dumb,
so he opens not his mouth.
In his humiliation justice was denied him.
Who can describe his generation?
For his life is taken up from the earth.”

And the eunuch said to Philip, “About whom, pray, does the prophet say this, about himself or about some one else?” Then Philip opened his mouth, and beginning with this scripture he told him the good news of Jesus. And as they went along the road they came to some water, and the eunuch said, “See, here is water! What is to prevent my being baptized?” And he commanded the chariot to stop, and they both went down into the water, Philip and the eunuch, and he baptized him. And when they came up out of the water, the Spirit of the Lord caught up Philip; and the eunuch saw him no more, and went on his way rejoicing.

Here we have a story that more clearly represents our present evangelizing and catechetical challenge: leading a person with limited exposure to the person and story of Jesus Christ into a relationship with him and his Church.

The eunuch had no lived relationship with Jesus. There isn’t even any indication that he knew his name! St. Phillip, beginning with the eunuch’s rudimentary knowledge of the prophet Isaiah, unfolds the Christian message, leading him to Jesus and entrance into his Body through baptism.

This is the same journey many people must make today. For some, as the eunuch, this may involve a journey that takes them through the RCIA and the Sacraments of Initiation. For others it may mean reconciliation and a return to the Church of their youth. Either way, we should not assume that a living, active relationship with Jesus Christ exists; it must be cultivated and encouraged. That is our challenge today and why this story should be close to the hearts of evangelists and catechists.

What other biblical stories do you think shed light on the work of the New Evangelization?